Re: how to save an edited image ( painted on an applet) as .jpg or .gif

From:
"Andrew Thompson" <andrewthommo@gmail.com>
Newsgroups:
comp.lang.java.programmer
Date:
17 Mar 2007 22:57:54 -0700
Message-ID:
<1174197474.057130.53860@e1g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>
On Mar 18, 4:29 pm, "Andrew Thompson" <andrewtho...@gmail.com> wrote:

On Mar 18, 11:45 am, "venkat" <venkatakrishn...@gmail.com> wrote:
..

..applet ,..
..Now I want to save this
edited image as a .jpg or .gif file.

....

Note that to save to the local file system, an
applet will either need to be signed and trusted,
or launched using web start, for use of the JNLP
API file access abilities.


Now that I have tried that image editor, I
realise they have done something quite tricky
(but very inefficient), in order to avoid
having to ask the user to accept signed code.

To deliver the final image to the user, the
applet transmits the altered image back to
the server, the server prepares a standard
Gif (PNG, whatever..) and delivers that back
to the client as a standard image with the
message 'right click to save..' (I wonder how
that works for mice with only one button?).

In any case, to do it 'just like they have'
requires an active server (to process and
redirect the images back to the client).

I recommend web start as an alternative,
since that will allow the images to be
saved directly by the client, without
having to go for a round trip to the server
and back (though in the 'unsigned' form that
I recommend deploying, Java will prompt the
user if they want to allow file access on
image save). Here is an example of the JNLP
file API usage in an unsigned application.
<http://www.physci.org/jws/#fs>

HTH

Andrew T.

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